Posts Tagged ‘Mason Crosby’

Ever think where the San Diego Chargers might be if they didn’t have Philip Rivers on their team?

Um, no, smartass, saying “in Los Angeles” isn’t the proper answer.

They also wouldn’t have been in the game against the unbeaten Green Bay Packers if not for Rivers having a superb contest.

The Chargers suffered a painful 27-20 loss to the Packers on Sunday in what was an absolutely stellar effort by the veteran quarterback.

Rivers had the most prolific game by a quarterback in Chargers history – the type of performance that would even make Hall of Famer Don Fouts blush.

Rivers set clubs records for completions (43), attempts (65) and passing yardage (503). He broke his own club record for passing yardage – 455 against the Seattle Seahawks in 2010 – while becoming only the 17th player in NFL history to top 500 yards in a single game.

Receiver Keenan Allen caught 14 passes – one short of the franchise record he shares with Hall of Famer Kellen Winslow – before leaving with a hip injury.

But all that production didn’t equate to a victory. The Chargers only scored 20 points despite accumulating 32 first downs, possessing the ball for 38 minutes and running 89 plays to Green Bay’s 49.

The Chargers had a chance to force overtime but a third-and-goal run by Woodhead was halted for a 1-yard loss and Rivers’ fourth-down throw into the right flat never reached Woodhead as the pass was broken up by Green Bay cornerback Damarious Randall.

Just like that, Rivers’ big game wasn’t enough.

Here’s the number why the Chargers head home disappointed – 20.

All that production and San Diego only scored 20 points.

Rough way to drop to 2-4 and pretty much know that you are out of the AFC West race with the Denver Broncos being undefeated.

The Packers remained unbeaten with the victory and recorded their 13th straight home win. Oh yeah, they are also 10-1 lifetime against the Chargers.

So the history wasn’t good as San Diego’s lone win against the Packers came on Oct. 7, 1984 and you may know it is also one of the most-ignored victories in franchise history.

That’s because the Padres beat the Chicago Cubs to reach the World Series for the first time that same afternoon. Winslow set his franchise record during that contest but the only receptions most San Diegans saw were on the Monday Night Football halftime highlights the following night.

So considering the history, it wasn’t looking too good for the Chargers when they spotted Green Bay a 17-3 lead.

Aaron Rodgers threw a 5-yard touchdown pass to James Starks in the first quarter and Starks later added a 65-yard touchdown run. Starks appeared stuffed in the middle of line before reversing to the right and taking advantage of the fact the Chargers backside defenders over pursued and meandered down the field for the score.

But the Chargers regrouped and scored a significant touchdown right before halftime. Allen caught a pass near the goal line with 12 seconds left – a review confirmed he was a foot short – and San Diego nearly let time run out before using one of its two timeouts.

Nearly a pretty major gaffe by coach Mike McCoy, who has made a habit of curious decisions during his head-coaching stint. There was no reason to be scrambling to the line and trying to get set to snap the ball at the last second. He had TWO timeouts.

If the play gets reviewed, the result can only be improved for the Chargers. The replay officials may have ruled Allen got in as opposed to being a foot short. So no need to hurry and get a play off.

Then weirder, McCoy ran in the field-goal kicking team while the play was under review. It is OK if you used your Nancy Kerrigan “WHYYYYYYY?” voice because that was even sillier than the timeout fiasco.

Finally, San Diego got the offense back on the field and cashed in as Rivers threw a 1-yard touchdown pass to Dontrelle Inman. Trailing 17-10 at halftime in Lambeau Field provided hope and that was infinitely much better than trailing 17-3 or 17-6.

Helping matters more is that the Chargers continued to play strong at the outset of the third quarter and tied the contest on Rivers’ 19-yard scoring pass to Ladarius Green.

But Rodgers finally got Green Bay moving again after going more than 20 minutes without a first down. Once the Packers went ahead 24-17 on Rodgers’ 8-yard pass to James Jones with 46 seconds left in the third quarter, it wouldn’t have been a surprise if things fell apart.

It didn’t happen as the Chargers moved back within four points on Jeff Lambo’s 32-yard field goal and were able to make the Packers settle for a 28-yard field goal by Mason Crosby with 2:37 remaining.

But the final drive didn’t produce the tying points. Rivers drove the Chargers down the field but the offense stalled after reaching the 3-yard line. Two Woodhead runs and two incomplete passes later, San Diego walked off the field with its third road loss of the season.

Just don’t put any blame on Philip Rivers.

Sure, he only guided his club to 20 points but what more could he do?

He did it all on Sunday and it still wasn’t enough for a victory.

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The New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks are headed to the Super Bowl but the head coach most responsible for a team making it to the big game isn’t New England’s Bill Belichick or Seattle’s Pete Carroll.

We’re talking about you, Mike McCarthy. You big boy did a great job of making sure the Seahawks could hang around and rally from 16 points down and eventually beat your Green Bay Packers 28-22 in overtime.

The Packers dominated the first two-thirds of the game but it is the first one-third – 20 minutes for those not good at division – where McCarthy flubbed. Green Bay was in Seattle’s territory repeatedly during that time and scored just one touchdown and kicked three field goals – including Mason Crosby boots of 18 and 19 yards.

You’ve got to go for it on one of the fourth-down opportunities coach. Maybe better play calling on first, second or third down would’ve helped too. You do recall that Aaron Rodgers – you know “The Discount Doublecheck” – is your quarterback.

By not taking say a 24-0 during that 20 minutes of dominance hurt the Packers. Remember, Seattle didn’t even record its initial first down until past the midway point of the second quarter so McCarthy’s reluctance to be even mildly aggressive was a killer, especially when you factor in a Super Bowl berth was on the line.

The NFC Championship Game is not the time to coach scared. And those who coach scared often lose.

Seattle’s first touchdown came on special teams when holder Jon Ryan tossed a 19-yard scoring pass to Garry Gilliam with 4:41 left in the third quarter. And when Russell Wilson threw his fourth interception of the game late in the fourth quarter, it appeared that Green Bay might survive squandering so many points.

But the football Gods apparently got wind of what was going on and weren’t about to allow the Packers to move on to Glendale, Ariz. Wilson suddenly began moving the Seahawks and he scored on a 1-yard run to cap a seven-play, 69-yard drive to pull Seattle within 19-14 with 2:09 left.

Green Bay could still escape by recovering the onside kick but we all know a good collapse needs to have an onside recovery involved. And this one was a real doozy.

A guy that America knew only as “No. 86 on Green Bay” went up to recover the onside kick and it caromed off his hands and was recovered by Seattle’s Chris Matthews. The infamous person we now know as Brandon Bostick told reporters after the contest that it wasn’t his job to go for the ball.

You see, he is supposed to block and right behind him was receiver Jordy Nelson, who has the best hands on the Packers. But Bostick made that split-second decision to try to catch the ball and the door remained open for the Seahawks.

Four plays later, Seattle went ahead on Marshawn Lynch’s 24-yard touchdown run with 1:25 remaining and Wilson tossed a miraculous two-point conversion pass to Luke Willson to make it 22-19.

Though the Packers recovered enough to force overtime on Crosby’s fifth field goal of the game – too bad Green Bay’s head coach didn’t perform as well as its kicker – you knew what was going to happen in overtime.

A team that should have been put away much, much earlier in the football game had all the momentum and Green Bay was shell-shocked. A 12-point lead late in the fourth quarter had gotten away and teams don’t typically recover from such a collapse.

So it was no surprise when Wilson threaded a perfect 35-yard touchdown pass to Jermaine Kearse just 3:19 into overtime. The contest was going to end with Seattle celebrating at some point so the earlier the better.

Kearse and Lynch (157 rushing yards) might have left the stadium as heroes but we all know who had the biggest influence on how this game was decided.

Yep, we’re looking at you, Mike McCarthy. Bad time for a coach to have a bad performance at the office.