Posts Tagged ‘Dean Spanos’

Monday is that dreaded night for San Diegans who vociferously supported the Chargers for the past 56 seasons.

Friday was the rough day for me because I happened to draw the preview assignment for the Chargers’ opener against the Denver Broncos on Monday night.

I took that vow of journalistic objectivity a quarter century ago and play no favorites – or enemies – when being paid to produce work. Whatever needs to be written is done so and always in a professional manner.

But this preview was a different assignment in many ways.

It is the Chargers’ first game since abandoning a city that cheered them unconditionally, never more evident than the night 75,000 people filled the stadium on a Sunday night to welcome the team home after beating the Pittsburgh Steelers in the AFC Championship Game.

It is the same city that was treated rudely by Dean Spanos the past few years, never more so than 2016 when the club had to play in San Diego because NFL owners didn’t vote for the team’s Los Angeles relocation proposal. Spanos was crushed not to gain approval and imagine all the fake at-chance conversations he had with fans of the team he encountered (you know, on the days he actually wasn’t afraid to leave his La Jolla house).

So when it came to the sentence that needed to be written in the preview, I swallowed hard and said it in the proper journalistic way even though the most honest way would have been to write that “spineless Dean Spanos picked up his longtime squad of losers and will now mis-manage it in smoggy Los Angeles, where they don’t even care about his miserable organization.”

Instead, the professional way won out and rings out soundly as the wording reminds the reader of the travesty without bordering on a cheap shot … “while the Chargers play their initial game since unceremoniously ditching San Diego after 56 seasons.”

Read the stellar preview here: http://sltrib.sportsdirectinc.com/football/nfl-preview.aspx?page=/data/NFL/matchups/g1_preview_44.html

I went to dozens of Chargers’ games as a kid and later covered the team as a professional for seven seasons. Once you cover a team and are around that type of nonsense – lots of petty things that fans don’t see and can’t wrap their heads around – you really could care less about the team.

But yeah, remember last September when I said the Chargers would lose to the Cleveland Browns? And they came through in December when they visited Cleveland, being the ONLY NFL team to lose to the horrific Browns.

That is the memory that sticks with me as Spineless Spanos took his sorry team to Smogville. Losing to the truly lousy Browns.

Spanos failed to land a new stadium, he signed off on the move to hire Norv Turner as coach, he was fired up about the drafting of Ryan Leaf, and he promoted his own kids to top-level positions in the organization to run it for basically the next 30-to-40 years.

Who wants a guy like that polluting the San Diego sports scene any longer?

So instead of ignoring the Chargers on Monday night, I will turn on the game because it will be fun to see the Chargers do what they do best: Come up short just like their so-called leader.

Dang, imagine if I could write THAT type of stuff in the preview.

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The NFL draft begins Thursday and I am noticing I’m not really looking forward to it.

That’s an odd feeling in that I covered the draft as a professional more than a dozen times at either the professional or college level. And always made sure my Saturdays were clear to watch it prior to that well before this decade’s dumb three-day format.

Analyzing things, I can see why I’m not all that interested in the 2017 NFL draft.

That’s because this is the first draft in my lifetime in which my hometown doesn’t have an NFL team.

Not the least bit interested in who the Los Angeles Chargers pick. Geez, it is hard writing that city’s name before Chargers.

The Chargers belong to San Diego, not the smog clowns and silicone fakes of Los Angeles. The draft is really the first time a big NFL event happens in which the Chargers aren’t referred to as “San Diego Chargers.”

When Roger Goodell reads that phrase off the cue card as the Chargers make their first-round pick, it is a loud reminder to the football world that San Diego is no longer an NFL town.

Dean Spanos had ample opportunities to make it work in San Diego and didn’t have the big-boy leadership abilities to make it happen. Good riddance to him and his poorly run organization.

That is where we will miss the draft — mocking the Chargers for their sad first-round picks.

The lousy picks roll off the tongue easily — receiver Walker Gillette in 1970, running back Leon Burns in 1971, fullback Bo Matthews in 1974, cornerback Mossy Cade in 1984 (Google him to see what a total reject he is) and the biggest draft bust of all-time in quarterback Ryan Leaf in 1998.

There are many other busts — one of my favorites being receiver Craig “Buster” Davis in 2007. I called up Davis’ receivers coach at LSU while writing a profile story and got greeted with all kinds of criticisms of Davis’ desire, toughness and inability to stay healthy.

Guess what Davis was known for during his 26 total games over four seasons with the Chargers? Yep, low desire, no toughness, always injured.

During Davis’ second season, I already wrote song lyrics about him called “Wasted Draft Pick,” to the tune of Rod Stewart’s “Infatuation.”

Great pick, A.J. Smith! Might want to talk a player’s position coach before you select him.

Of course, there were superb first-round picks over the years too — defensive tackle Gary “Big Hands” Johnson in 1975, tight end Kellen Winslow in 1979, defensive end Leslie O’Neal in 1986, linebacker Junior Seau in 1990, running back LaDainian Tomlinson in 2001 and the great quarterback maneuver of 2004 when Eli Manning refused to play for the Chargers but Smith drafted him anyway before working out a trade with the New York Giants for Philip Rivers.

General manager Tom Telesco has fared well in the first round of the last three drafts with cornerback Jason Verrett, running back Melvin Gordon and defensive end Joey Bosa.

The Chargers select seventh this time around so they are positioned well to land another good talent.

But there will be a different feeling when Telesco makes his pick.

You see, these aren’t the San Diego Chargers anymore. So it no longer is a big deal if the team scores with its pick or lands another bust.

Perhaps that is why the draft’s appeal isn’t there for me this year. My hometown doesn’t have a team and the fun is gone.

You see, I could care less if a team from Los Angeles messes up its draft.

Weekly links is back and what a weird week for San Diego football fans.

Dean Spanos is finally taking the Chargers to Los Angeles and he has become a national laughingstock. It felt like only San Diegans were aware of what a dork the guy is but the announcement of the move displayed that all football fans are fully aware.

Even other pro sports team were mocking the Chargers … ouch. And you could almost hear that spineless public relations director yelling “Take a chill pill” if you recall that silly incident from the 2012 season.

My favorite thing I ran across was some Los Angeles writer giving a rundown of the organization and wondering if the move to Los Angeles could affect the Chargers’ on-field play in 2017.

Ummmmmm, they are 9-23 over the past two seasons, dude. And they were the only team in the NFL to lose to the dreadful Cleveland Browns.

If moving to Los Angeles is going to affect the record, the Chargers will BE the Cleveland Browns.

Happiest team about the Chargers’ move to Los Angeles is the soccer team that will share the StubHub Center with the Chargers.

That’s because the LA Galaxy are guaranteed to still be the highest-scoring team playing in that venue.

 

OK, on to the links.

It will be interesting to see how the Dallas Cowboys fare against the Green Bay Packers on Sunday.

Quarterback Dak Prescott and fellow rookie Ezekiel Elliott (NFL-best 1,631 rushing yards) haven’t looked like novices during a 13-3 season. But how will they handle the playoff pressure?

Prescott has handled everything well while going from projected third-stringer to making Tony Romo forever irrelevant. But the playoffs are a completely different animal and things can go wrong quickly.

You might recall Dan Fouts’ first career playoff game as the leader of the Don Coryell Chargers. He threw five interceptions and the heavily favored Chargers lost to the Houston Oilers.

If a Hall of Famer like Fouts could fall flat on his face, so can a fourth-round pick out of Mississippi State.

Not to forget that Aaron Rodgers is hotter than lava (you bet lava made it into my lead) and is an experienced veteran of the playoff wars. Rodgers has thrown 18 touchdown passes without being intercepted over the past seven games.

Here is the stellar Packers-Cowboys preview — http://www.upi.com/Sports_News/NFL/2017/01/12/Green-Bay-Packers-vs-Dallas-Cowboys-Aaron-Rodgers-Dak-Prescott-under-the-microscope/9991484249346/

 

Now that it is mid-January, it is time to start figuring out which college basketball conferences are good and which ones are pretenders.

I haven’t yet figured out where the SEC stands but I know what direction I’m leaning.

Kentucky is pretty talented but we saw South Carolina collapse late last season to be relegated to the NIT so it is hard to take the Gamecocks seriously.

Which brings me to Florida.

I’ve had to watch the Gators play a few times lately and write about them because I’m paid to do so and their record (13-3, 4-0 SEC) appears to be better than the sum of its parts.

In Tuesday’s 80-67 victory over Alabama (now that school is a pretender), it was Florida’s ninth-leading scorer playing the hero. Some guy named Keith Stone and his 14-point effort improved his scoring average to 4.6.

You can say it is a good quality when a team can have its ninth-best player lead them in scoring. But the other fact is that teams like this typically start displaying their true colors in mid-February.

They don’t tend to get better — and often will decline.

Florida has one good scorer in sophomore KeVaughn Allen. Senior Canyon Barry (son of Rick) provides scoring punch off the bench but it isn’t a team that scares anyone.

The Gators play Georgia (I’m leaning toward pretender for the Bulldogs) on Saturday and I will be watching closely.

Here is the stellar Georgia-Florida preview — http://www.cbssports.com/college-basketball/news/no-23-florida-goes-for-7th-straight-vs-georgia/

 

The Los Angeles Rams hired a coach who turns 31 years old on Jan. 24.

That’s correct — 31 years old. Not 41. Not 51. Not 61. Heck, not 71.

Sean McVay was hired by the Rams to turn around their fortunes and perhaps he’s too young to know that’s nearly impossible. And since Kroenke the Donkey owns the team, is there anybody anywhere that wants to see the Rams win?

McVay is the youngest coach in NFL history as I’m sure you figured out. He was most recently the offensive coordinator of the Washington Redskins.

The fun part about stories like this is you see a report and you start writing and reporting like a madman. It took just 15 minutes to write this breaking news and that includes doing all the research on McVay’s background and searching for statements from McVay and the Rams.

This story was out on the national wire 20 minutes before the Rams even released the news themselves.

That is part of the fun as you never know what you might have to write on a moment’s notice.

So now I’m well-versed on Sean McVay.

Oh, there is a player on the Rams who is older than McVay. Now that’s funny.

Here is the stellar breaking news story — http://www.sportsxchange.com/tsxfiles/?page_id=211&max_colums=60&story_id=156335

   Been asked several times since last night about how I feel about the Chargers’ move from San Diego to Los Angeles.

   My answer has been pretty consistent — the actions of the team having been pointing toward this development for 18 months and it is like the day has finally arrived.

   Anger? Nope, not from me. I put on the journalistic objectivity cap a long time ago. I also covered that team so I am also quite aware from the inside perspective of what a poorly run organization it is.

   Sadness? For others. For all the fans that loyally supported the franchise since 1961. For all the younger folks who may not have a team to watch and support for future decades.

   Good riddance? Sure. Dean Spanos is a horrible leader and he will be an even bigger failure in Los Angeles, where the stakes are higher. San Diegans want to keep their team but they despise the ownership. So yep, get your sad-sack meek self out of town, Dean.

   And stay out!

   Dean Spanos is the son of a very wealthy man named Alex Spanos. Dean didn’t EARN his way to being a pro sports owner. He got there by being born into the right family. He has always been in way over his head when it comes to running a football team.

   Heck, his leadership skills were horrible when the Chargers posted a franchise-best 14-2 record in 2006. General manager A.J. Smith wouldn’t acknowledge coach Marty Schottenheimer and little Deano was too afraid to make the two grown-ups sit in a room and work out their differences.

   And remember, the same situation occurred in 1996 when Bobby Ross had to exit as coach because he and general manager Bobby Beathard could no longer co-exist.

   So it happens again a decade later and Spineless Spanos still can’t figure out how to handle it.

   Schottenheimer was fired and a few days later, a few of us reporters got an audience with Dean on the second floor of the facility.

   There was nothing more surreal than seeing his flustered face as he began telling us that the organization was dysfunctional.

   This after a 14-2 season!

   Imagine how dysfunctional things were when they went 1-15 in 2000.

   Things were dysfunctional because Dean Spanos doesn’t function properly.

   He made it clear he was done with San Diego in the fall of 2015 as he worked overtime on getting the Carson project approved. What a hit to the ego it had to be that other NFL owners trusted Stan Kroenke the Donkey with the Los Angles market more than Dumbbell Dean.

   So he came back to San Diego with his tail between his legs and began talking this big game about how he was going to get the stadium thing solved. I just chuckled at that stuff.

   Dean Spanos was unable to get it done the previous dozen years. Why would he suddenly become this stadium magician?

   The ballot measure in November never had a chance and the fact that even 43 percent voted yes tells me there were a lot people who voted for it that felt desperate to keep their football team.

   That’s exactly what it was — San Diegans wanting to keep their team. Nobody was voting to keep Dean Spanos or his two sons, who now have major roles (Again, two kids born into the right family, no EARNING things when you are filthy rich).

   The best thing is the Chargers have taken the plunge to Los Angeles and nobody in that smoggy city cares that they are coming.

   USC football will always be 20 times more popular than the Chargers … heck, the football pecking order goes like this:

   USC, Rams, UCLA, Chargers … Spanos should be happy Long Beach State no longer has a program.

   Oh, so reflective? Certainly.

   I attended dozens of Chargers’ games as a kid. The cost was $1.50 the first time I went. There probably isn’t anything in the stadium that you can get for $1.50 now.

   I waited overnight to get playoff tickets — in the Don Coryell era, playoffs were a yearly thing — and I later covered the team for seven seasons as a professional. Spent a lot of time in that complex in Murphy Canyon, both during the era the Chargers let reporters in the building and again in a later era when they threw the reporters in a stinky trailer that probably couldn’t pass code.

   That also means I spent a lot of time at Qualcomm Stadium. It was a good place when I first started covering games there — including two Super Bowls — but it certainly had declined over time.

   One time they were doing the Sky Show fireworks after a San Diego State football game and I went into a back room in the press box to write. And with every loud boom, I was surprised the stadium didn’t collapse to the ground.

   During my last season covering games, I was on board with everybody that said it needed to be replaced. It was officially a dump.

   But Dean Spanos never got his stadium. The San Diego voters said no to the infinitely rich guy who could have built his own stadium a decade earlier. Part of why they voted no is that San Diegans don’t respect Dean Spanos or his cronies.

   San Diego loves its football team. It just despises the guy who moved it.

 

   It sure has been a fun time on Twitter since news of the move broke Wednesday night. Here are some of my contributions:

Good-bye #Chargers … don’t forget to pack all your #SuperBowl trophies … oh, none of those? … Hmmm, pack all your losing seasons.

Marlon McCree is telling people tonight he’d still run with that interception he fumbled to set up #Patriots rally. #SpanosEraChargersFail

A.J. Smith still bragging to people that getting third-round compensation pick for Drew Brees was an outstanding move #SpanosEraChargersFail

That time #Chargers took bust Craig “Buster” Davis in first round & his college WR coach slammed him in my feature. #SpanosEraChargersFail

If the eggs were off the mark or fell incomplete, they were thrown by Craig Whelihan. #ChargersSpanosEraFail

Can we slide in the Galaxy at No. 11 and drop the #Chargers to 12? Heck, slide in the WNBA team too. No. 13 it is.

Two words: Ryan Leaf. #ChargersSpanosEraFail

This might be as fun as day the fan at training camp serenaded Ryan Leaf with “Lonesome Loser” and Leaf tried to fight him. #SpanosEraFail

1-15 in 2000 with 11 straight loses to start season & coach Mike Riley led team in “Hip, Hip Hooray” after lone win. #ChargersSpanosEraFail

350-pound Chris Mims drunk at downtown Del Taco, urinates outside, beats 150-pounder with belt, steals his four tacos #ChargersSpanosEraFail

Not sure what this 4 thing is … perhaps #Chargers will play in Los Angeles high school section 4A level during time at tiny StubHub.

That #Chargers logo with the 4 … got to be the Spanos way of celebrating all those fourth-place finishes in the AFC West. #SpanosEraFail

The time Dean Spanos looked at me & said the #Chargers were a dysfunctional organization. After going 14-2. Look at them now. #SpanosEraFail

The night in Boston when Dean Spanos looked me in eye & said Philip Rivers didn’t have torn ACL. Two days later: Rivers torn ACL #SpanosFail

LA Galaxy still assured of being highest-scoring team playing in #StubHubCenter with arrival of #Chargers this fall. #ChargersSpanosEraFail

San Diego State running back Donnel Pumphrey plays in the final game of his standout career on Saturday and he should be recognized as the all-time leading rusher in college football history when it ends.

But alas, that won’t be entirely true.

The NCAA is a weirdo organization and it doesn’t recognize bowl statistics if they are from before 2002. But eventually, the NCAA is going to come to its senses and count those games.

Even that group of people won’t be dumb forever, right?

So come Saturday in the Las Vegas Bowl, Pumphrey (6,290) needs 108 rushing yards against a tough Houston Cougars’ defense to surpass Ron Dayne (6,397) as the all-time record holder. But he really needs to gain 836 yards if he wants to keep the record.

Count Dayne’s bowl games and the Wisconsin star — who played from 1996-99 — rushed for 7,125 yards.

Pumphrey may get the record Saturday to cap off a fantastic career but he will only be renting it.

Here is the stellar Las Vegas Bowl preview — http://www.albanyherald.com/sports/las-vegas-bowl-capsule/article_3e2232c7-43c3-5573-a907-b154c71c1d26.html

 

The San Diego Chargers are playing their next-to-last game in San Diego on Sunday as there won’t be a January reprieve this time around.

The team is off to Los Angeles, which means Dean Spanos gets to play second fiddle to Kroenke the Donkey (Rams owner Stan Kroenke) until the end of time. Or a shorter time span if Donald Trump learns where the bomb buttons are hidden.

Regardless, rubbing salt in the wounds of San Diego sports fans is this nugget: The Oakland Raiders can clinch a playoff spot by beating the Chargers at Qualcomm Stadium.

Now that really hurts.

Oakland is on the verge of ending a 14-year playoff drought and has one of the top quarterbacks in the game in Derek Carr and one of the elite pass rushers in defensive end Khalil Mack. The Raiders can make some noise in the postseason too.

But Chargers’ fans don’t want to see this clinching, that’s for sure. There are already enough bad memories with the Raiders — Stabler to Banaszak to Casper rates as the worst and the 1980 AFC title game is right behind — and Oakland celebrating a playoff berth on the field once home to Dan Fouts, Kellen Winslow, Junior Seau and LaDainian Tomlinson would be one final act of rubbing it in the faces of San Diegans.

The Chargers may be goners but San Diego’s intense hate of the Raiders will live on.

Here is the stellar Raiders-Chargers preview (back to the New York Times link!) — http://nytimes.stats.com/fb/preview.asp?g=20161218024

The links tradition is on a roll now … unlike the San Diego Chargers.

Three fourth-quarter collapses have saddled the Chargers with a 1-3 record and coach Mike McCoy is two losses away from being fired.

McCoy won’t be dismissed if the Chargers lose to the Oakland Raiders this Sunday unless he punches Dean Spanos after the game.

But when the Chargers get smacked around by the Denver Broncos four days later on Thursday Night Football, you can expect McCoy to be informed the following morning that his services are no longer needed.

Offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt would certainly be named interim coach and the extra 72 hours would come in handy to help the staff in preparations for the Atlanta Falcons on Oct. 24.

Sure hope there aren’t some Chargers’ fans bemoaning that the team isn’t 4-0. Good teams don’t blow three games in the final five minutes in three of the first four weeks.

The Chargers aren’t a good team so the meltdowns aren’t a total surprise — and gosh, how excited was Drew Brees to get to rally the New Orleans Saints from 13 points down for a 35-34 victory over the franchise that discarded him?

The Raiders are 3-1 and quarterback Derek Carr is on the verge of stardom.

OK, on to the link, the stellar preview of the Chargers-Raiders game is here — http://www.foxsports.com/san-diego/story/chargers-hope-to-solve-fourth-quarter-woes-vs-raiders-100616

 

“Mike lives in Boise, might want to handle” came the directive as if it rates as a special occasion to write about two Mountain West programs.

But audiblizing into the plan is an easy thing when you have a great boss. Plus, I knew there was an easy angle to this Boise State at New Mexico preview.

New Mexico was 30.5-point underdogs last season and beat Boise State on the famed blue turf in Boise. Let that sink in, 30.5-point underdogs. A team that heavily favored really has to suffer an extreme drop in its quality of play and its entire coaching staff has to be totally outworked and outsmarted by the opposing staff.

And that is what happened as New Mexico posted a 31-24 victory. Then the Lobos rubbed it in by posing for team pictures on the field with a New Mexico state flag.

Seriously, the Lobos pack a New Mexico state flag when they go on the road?

That is really kind of weird, isn’t it?

So don’t believe Boise State coach Bryan Harsin when he acts like his team isn’t out for revenge. What coaches say for public consumption is seldom the same as they say behind closed doors.

Here is the stellar preview — http://charlotteobserver.stats.com/cfb/preview.asp?g=201610070092

 

Jim Harbaugh sure comes off as a prima donna and/or an egomaniac these days, doesn’t he?

The funny thing is he was outstanding to deal with when he was an NFL player.

I dealt with him when he was on the San Diego Chargers and he was terrific to deal with at all times. One time, the team was doing offseason public caravans and he asked the staffers to bring him by my newspaper. Harbaugh was quite a hit with the circulation ladies, let’s just say that.

The bigger barometer on how good he was to deal with is this: The Chargers cut him (yep, Ryan Leaf era) and he fielded my call on his home phone in Coronado. Spent 15-plus minutes filling up my notebook.

Most NFL players go into hiding in such a situation.

I also can’t help but laugh about the time Harbaugh told me he was interested in the San Diego State football coaching job, a story that I broke. But you see, the Aztecs weren’t all that interested in him.

A couple members of the athletic department were still upset that Harbaugh had publicly intimated his University of San Diego team could beat San Diego State.

One of the assistant athletic directors even chided me for my article and insisted they wouldn’t hire him.

But San Diego State did interview Harbaugh as part of a poorly executed coaching search. The same assistant AD gave me a hard time after I broke the story that Dennis Erickson was interested, giving me the same “we’re not hiring him” lecture.

Oh yeah, the school did interview Erickson too.

Think of this — current Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher was one of the two finalists. So a downtrodden San Diego State program could have hired either Fisher or Harbaugh and they still messed things up.

The Aztecs hired Chuck Long, who lasted three seasons and twice suffered home losses to lower-level Cal Poly.

A big miss for San Diego State. Of course, we also know what would have happened. Harbaugh would have won 18 games over his first two seasons and landed a better job.

That’s what guys who know how to win do.

And here’s the stellar Michigan-Rutgers preview — http://www.espn.com/ncf/preview/_/id/400869636

 

Here’s a little baseball for you to round out his edition of the links.

The Chicago Cubs had the best record in the majors this season but we all know their history — 108 years since they last won a World Series.

The San Francisco Giants have a different type of formula — they have won the World Series (2010, 2012, 2014) in every even-numbered season this decade.

Should be an interesting series and the Cubs already caught their biggest break. The Giants had to play in the National League wild-card contest and ace Madison Bumgarner was needed to pitch a four-hit shutout.

The means he will only pitch once in the series against the Cubs. Chicago went up against Bumgarner twice this season and lost both times.

All the pressure is on the Cubs and players like probable NL MVP Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo need to play much, much better than they did in the 2015 postseason.

Anyway, here is the stellar Game 1 preview — http://www.usatoday.com/sports/mlb/event/2016/410446/preview/

Remember a few short months ago when NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said he expected the Chargers to move to Los Angeles?

Things surely have changed over the past few months. Goodell was live in San Diego for last Saturday’s downtown stadium rally, also known as the kickoff effort to gather signatures for a ballot initiative.

The commish has reversed field in impressive O.J. Simpson-like fashion – that’s the football player version, not the double murderer – since the Rams relocated to Los Angeles in mid-January.

When it became clear Chargers president Dean Spanos and Rams owner Stan Kroenke weren’t going to get along in terms of sharing a Los Angeles stadium, Goodell was suddenly all-in when it came to keeping the Chargers in San Diego.

His comments have repeatedly been pro-San Diego and there are three huge reasons for that: Money, lots of money and huge amounts of money.

The NFL will profit much more if the effort to build the Chargers a stadium passes. (Hey, I had to write a quick hitter on the rally on Saturday — Roger Goodell speaks in favor of downtown San Diego stadium).

Goodell will now continue to have his San Diego cheerleading uniform on during the rest of the process and is even talking about the Super Bowl returning to town if a new football stadium is approved.

Just know it’s never a bad thing when the guy who runs the NFL is in your corner.

“I think the Chargers belong in San Diego,” Goodell said. “I think this is a great community, a great fan base. Everyone has acknowledged that we need a new stadium.”

At least Goodell has acknowledged the Chargers belong in San Diego.

Better late than never.

Isn’t it funny how badly Dean Spanos suddenly wants to stay in San Diego after Carson bombed and he had to spend time talking to Kroenke the Donkey?

If you see the Chargers owner carousing around La Jolla this weekend, make sure you get us that picture with his tail between his legs.

At least Spanos can go outside again without being jeered after announcing on Friday that the team will remain in San Diego for the 2016 NFL season and make one more attempt at finding a stadium solution.

Of course he made that announcement about an hour after reaching an agreement in principle to share the proposed football stadium in Inglewood with the Los Angeles Rams.

Got to keep the leverage as high as possible you know.

Actions speak louder than carefully crafted press release statements – you did notice Dean didn’t face questions from probing reporters, right? So what happens over the next few months will speak volumes about Spanos’ intentions as the franchise has until Jan. 15, 2017 to decide whether to move to Los Angeles.

And Spanos’ actions over the final six months of 2015 – often carried out by spin doctor Mark Fabiani – spoke volumes about how badly he wanted his team in Los Angeles.

But Spanos wanted to be in Carson as part of a two-team stadium deal with the Oakland Raiders. Having to be a lesser tenant with the Rams in Inglewood – and irascible owner Stan Kroenke – wasn’t the intended destination.

Spanos reportedly felt confident the Carson project would prevail at the owners’ meeting in Houston earlier this month. He felt Kroenke the Donkey didn’t have enough votes to get Inglewood approved.

Spanos couldn’t have been more wrong as Kroenke’s Inglewood stadium project won by a resounding 30-2 vote.

Hey, a four-touchdown margin. Sounds like some recent Chargers’ scores.

Then Spanos pondered his choices and neither were all that good. He could move to Los Angeles and be second on the NFL ledger behind the Rams – and third overall behind USC – or make peace with San Diego officials and the team’s fans.

It didn’t help when Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti made it clear he wasn’t interested in the Chargers joining the Rams. Garcetti strongly suggested the Chargers should remain in San Diego.

Spanos probably wasn’t in all that big of a rush to write that $550 million relocation check either.

Anyway, San Diego city officials submitted a $1.1 billion stadium proposal to the NFL earlier this month so there certainly is an opportunity to get something done and keep the team in San Diego.

In fact, Spanos said in his Friday statement that his intention is to work toward remaining in San Diego for the long term and finding a stadium solution.

“I have met with Mayor (Kevin) Faulconer and (County) Supervisor (Ron) Roberts and I look forward to working closely with them and the business community to resolve our stadium dilemma,” Spanos said. “We have an option and an agreement with the Los Angeles Rams to go to Inglewood in the next year, but my focus is on San Diego.

“This has been (the team’s) home for 55 years, and I want to keep the team here and provide the world-class stadium experience you deserve.”

Spanos said he is moving forward “with a fresh perspective and new sense of possibility” and I’m sure the team’s fans are hoping that proves true.

Spanos and Fabiani treated the fan base like dirt this past season. But the thing about fans is this – they just want their team to stay put.

Fans live and die with how the team fares each Sunday (or Monday, or Thursday). They just don’t want to live with the pain of their beloved team playing 100-plus miles up the freeway.

Another good thing the fans have going for them is that commissioner Roger Goodell feels the same way. He wants the NFL to remain in San Diego.

“We are very supportive of the decision by Dean Spanos to continue his efforts in San Diego and work with local leaders to develop a permanent stadium solution,” Goodell said in a statement. “NFL ownership has committed $300 million to assist in the cost of building a new stadium in San Diego. I have pledged the league’s full support in helping Dean to fulfill his goal.”

Getting a deal done in San Diego would change Spanos’ reputation from most-hated person in San Diego to merely tolerable.

But know this: being the main tenant in a new stadium in San Diego is infinitely better than playing second fiddle to Kroenke the Donkey in Inglewood.

The Spanos family plane sits on the runway in San Diego on Wednesday.

The Spanos family plane sits on the runway in San Diego on Wednesday. Photo credit – Secret airport source.

 

So for one last time the “San Diego Chargers” will take the field.

Probably never to be referred to in that way again on a football field.

Sunday’s road game against the Denver Broncos will likely mark a sad end for a franchise that was adored by San Diegans for most of the past five-plus decades. And the only reason why enthusiasm dimmed this season was due to the club’s actions.

The stage was set when owner Dean Spanos made it clear he wanted to move the team. Proposals by the city of San Diego were scoffed at by Spanos and team spin doctor Mark Fabiani.

Instead of looking at a way to make things happen, Spanos and Fabiani repeatedly pointed out why the city’s proposals for a new stadium wouldn’t work.

Regardless, the City of San Diego submitted its proposal to build a $1.1 billion stadium for the team to the NFL on Wednesday. It’s a last-ditch effort by the city to keep the team but Spanos isn’t listening.

He is ready to apply for relocation as soon as Monday and is hoping to gain approval to move the team on either Jan. 12 or 13 when the league’s owners meet in Houston.

All along, Spanos has been working his fellow owners behind the scenes in hopes of approval to move the franchise.

Spanos envisions playing at a stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Carson. The greed of an NFL owner knows no limits and once the St. Louis Rams began looking at moving to Los Angeles, Spanos couldn’t help himself.

His greedy hands kept picturing the possibility of adding billions of dollars to his family’s net worth.

And now he is just a couple of weeks away from having his wish granted.

Once approval occurs, a team that began playing in San Diego in 1961 will flat-out vanish.

Too bad Spanos couldn’t just vanish and leave the team alone.

Good on-field play certainly disappeared this season as poor Philip Rivers has tried to carry a team with little talent. The squad carries a 4-11 record into the season finale as coach Mike McCoy continues to make poor decisions and display that he should be an offensive coordinator and not an NFL head coach.

The Chargers aren’t part of the playoff field for the fifth time in six seasons and this year’s record is the franchise’s worst since 2004.

Of course, winning has never been a Spanos specialty. The Chargers have made the playoffs only nine times in 32 seasons under the family’s ownership.

They were the owners for the team’s lone Super Bowl appearance when San Diego was smashed by the San Francisco 49ers following the 1994 season.

But coach Bobby Ross and general manager Bobby Beathard couldn’t get along and Spanos showed Ross the door after the 1996 season.

And they certainly were in position to reach the Super Bowl in the middle of last decade but again the lack of top-flight leadership by Spanos curtailed the possibility.

San Diego recorded a franchise-best 14-2 mark in 2006 but was ousted in the opening round of the playoffs by the New England Patriots. Once again, the coach and general manager didn’t know how to communicate and Spanos kept hard-nosed GM A.J. Smith and sent coach Marty Schottenheimer packing.

Spanos termed the situation as “dysfunctional” and apparently wasn’t smart enough to figure out his lack of a spine over the previous two seasons was a major factor. What leader would allow two of the most crucial people in the organization to go that long without talking?

Making the whole situation sadder is that the Chargers then hired Norv Turner as coach. Handing a team built to win a championship to a mediocre coach and leader assured the Chargers would miss their championship window – and they did.

Spanos will arrive in Los Angeles with a lousy football team and that isn’t going to help matters.

Know this: USC is the preferred football team in Los Angeles and there is no chance of the Chargers ever surpassing the Trojans when it comes to popularity.

Spanos also has to fire McCoy. You can’t arrive in Los Angeles with that kind of guy as your coach. He also needs a different public relations staff as having a staff in which the top two guys are lifetime wimposauras is going to be a detriment to doing PR properly in the multi-dimensional Los Angeles market.

Taking the history to Los Angeles will be awkward. You just can’t have Lance Alworth, Dan Fouts or LaDainian Tomlinson show up to wave to the crowd of a city that never watched them play.

Not to mention honoring the “Air Coryell” era or Junior Seau’s tremendous tenure or the franchise’s 1963 AFL title. Kellen Winslow’s performance in the epic playoff game in Miami on Jan. 2, 1982 certainly will never feel like a “Los Angeles” thing.

Added up, it’s just an all-around uncomfortable feel. A greedy owner didn’t get his way in San Diego so he is going to pick up his football team and move it 100-plus miles up the road.

The team will be missed for sure. The ownership won’t be.

And with his two overmatched sons lined up to run the team, the long-standing tradition of Spanos-led teams losing will surely continue.

Good luck, Los Angeles. And brace yourself for decades of buffoonery.

I can still recall hearing the news that Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon got injured in 1984 and would be sidelined with a lacerated kidney.

That injury occurred well before the days of the Internet – your home phone was the only way people could find you back then – so a friend and I headed over to the local bookstore to learn the meaning.

The second I saw the word “sliced” I suddenly felt real bad for McMahon, who was then one of the biggest jerks in pro sports.

I kept picturing a kidney being sliced and I would just cringe.

Well, lacerated kidney is back in the sports vernacular as San Diego Chargers receiver Keenan Allen is done for the season. Yep, he suffered a lacerated kidney during Sunday’s loss to the Baltimore Ravens.

The injury cuts short what was on pace to being a historic season for Allen, the third-year pro who has gone from being a third-round draft steal in 2013 to one of the NFL’s top receivers.

Allen had 67 receptions in eight games before leaving Sunday’s game at halftime due to the injury. The catches tie for third-most in NFL history over a team’s first eight games.

Atlanta’s Julio Jones (70 this season) and former Indianapolis standout Marvin Harrison (69 in 2002) are the only players to have more.

Another way to put Allen’s fabulous half season in perspective is this: He had 71 receptions during a fantastic rookie campaign in 2013 and then increased that to 77 catches last season.

He was not only on pace to shatter his personal high but he also was going to obliterate the Chargers franchise mark of 100 receptions by LaDainian Tomlinson in 2003.

But now Allen’s season is over. It ended with an acrobatic 13-yard touchdown catch in which he landed awkwardly and remained on the turf for several minutes.

Allen’s loss rates as a blow for Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers, who has been outstanding with 2,753 yards and 18 touchdowns. He has deep bonds with tight end Antonio Gates and receiver Malcom Floyd but has quickly built a fabulous rapport with Allen.

Judging by ownership intentions, Allen might have played his final game during the organization’s San Diego tenure. Team president Dean Spanos is working as hard as possible to get the franchise permission to move to Los Angeles.

That would leave San Diegans to remember Allen as the guy who lacerated his kidney as they cringe inside and feel phantom pain near their own kidneys.

There’s just something awful about that term: lacerated kidney.

Didn’t like it when it happened to Jim McMahon and don’t like it now as the situation plays out with Keenan Allen.