The New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks are headed to the Super Bowl but the head coach most responsible for a team making it to the big game isn’t New England’s Bill Belichick or Seattle’s Pete Carroll.

We’re talking about you, Mike McCarthy. You big boy did a great job of making sure the Seahawks could hang around and rally from 16 points down and eventually beat your Green Bay Packers 28-22 in overtime.

The Packers dominated the first two-thirds of the game but it is the first one-third – 20 minutes for those not good at division – where McCarthy flubbed. Green Bay was in Seattle’s territory repeatedly during that time and scored just one touchdown and kicked three field goals – including Mason Crosby boots of 18 and 19 yards.

You’ve got to go for it on one of the fourth-down opportunities coach. Maybe better play calling on first, second or third down would’ve helped too. You do recall that Aaron Rodgers – you know “The Discount Doublecheck” – is your quarterback.

By not taking say a 24-0 during that 20 minutes of dominance hurt the Packers. Remember, Seattle didn’t even record its initial first down until past the midway point of the second quarter so McCarthy’s reluctance to be even mildly aggressive was a killer, especially when you factor in a Super Bowl berth was on the line.

The NFC Championship Game is not the time to coach scared. And those who coach scared often lose.

Seattle’s first touchdown came on special teams when holder Jon Ryan tossed a 19-yard scoring pass to Garry Gilliam with 4:41 left in the third quarter. And when Russell Wilson threw his fourth interception of the game late in the fourth quarter, it appeared that Green Bay might survive squandering so many points.

But the football Gods apparently got wind of what was going on and weren’t about to allow the Packers to move on to Glendale, Ariz. Wilson suddenly began moving the Seahawks and he scored on a 1-yard run to cap a seven-play, 69-yard drive to pull Seattle within 19-14 with 2:09 left.

Green Bay could still escape by recovering the onside kick but we all know a good collapse needs to have an onside recovery involved. And this one was a real doozy.

A guy that America knew only as “No. 86 on Green Bay” went up to recover the onside kick and it caromed off his hands and was recovered by Seattle’s Chris Matthews. The infamous person we now know as Brandon Bostick told reporters after the contest that it wasn’t his job to go for the ball.

You see, he is supposed to block and right behind him was receiver Jordy Nelson, who has the best hands on the Packers. But Bostick made that split-second decision to try to catch the ball and the door remained open for the Seahawks.

Four plays later, Seattle went ahead on Marshawn Lynch’s 24-yard touchdown run with 1:25 remaining and Wilson tossed a miraculous two-point conversion pass to Luke Willson to make it 22-19.

Though the Packers recovered enough to force overtime on Crosby’s fifth field goal of the game – too bad Green Bay’s head coach didn’t perform as well as its kicker – you knew what was going to happen in overtime.

A team that should have been put away much, much earlier in the football game had all the momentum and Green Bay was shell-shocked. A 12-point lead late in the fourth quarter had gotten away and teams don’t typically recover from such a collapse.

So it was no surprise when Wilson threaded a perfect 35-yard touchdown pass to Jermaine Kearse just 3:19 into overtime. The contest was going to end with Seattle celebrating at some point so the earlier the better.

Kearse and Lynch (157 rushing yards) might have left the stadium as heroes but we all know who had the biggest influence on how this game was decided.

Yep, we’re looking at you, Mike McCarthy. Bad time for a coach to have a bad performance at the office.

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